I go places, most of them digital.

 

theonetruenators:

gentlemanbones:

ghostanime:

1998 Gaming Magazine

Hindsight is hilarious.

playstation: how long does it have?
into eternity and forever
Project X: is it for real?
no
Dreamcast: can it be stopped?
in its tracks
nintendo 64: can it survive
it could survive the seventy-fifth annual hunger games armed with nothing but a mildly rotten cantaloupe and a set of assembly instructions for an ikea desk

theonetruenators:

gentlemanbones:

ghostanime:

1998 Gaming Magazine

Hindsight is hilarious.

playstation: how long does it have?

into eternity and forever

Project X: is it for real?

no

Dreamcast: can it be stopped?

in its tracks

nintendo 64: can it survive

it could survive the seventy-fifth annual hunger games armed with nothing but a mildly rotten cantaloupe and a set of assembly instructions for an ikea desk

cubansmiles:

tessmunster:

femburton:

Jeff “Vintage Dick” Goldblum in GQ Magazine, September 2014

i love him so much.

Holy fuck. He’s so damn hot

shubbabang:

So I work at target now and one of my favorite things to do when I hear something in the next aisle fall is to drop what I’m doing and stand at the end of that aisle like so:

image

image

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2007excalibur2007:

scooblee:

chaofanatic:

brook:

halcy:

uh oh [x]

it’s time

Oh god dammit.

Not quite sure I’m following what’s going on, so tell me, what’s so bad about this?

my-moose-hacked-my:

synthetikweekend:

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

SO AMAZING.

Sweet!!

my-moose-hacked-my:

synthetikweekend:

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

SO AMAZING.

Sweet!!